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GESO: Pysanki

DJ
Daniel J. Matyola
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 3:50 AM

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe (and
among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Dan Matyola
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe (and among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 Comments are invited. Dan Matyola *https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery <https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery>*
MW
mike wilson
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 4:17 AM

On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com wrote:

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe (and
among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

> On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> wrote: > > > There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe (and > among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in > intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs > are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and > bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. > > These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: > > http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 > Comments are invited. Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well. Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring
BP
Bob Pdml
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 7:28 AM

On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com wrote:



On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com wrote:

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe (and
among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or eight years old.

I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to showing it to my mother when I got home.

But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform.

I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny.

On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson <m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com> wrote: > >  >> On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> wrote: >> >> >> There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe (and >> among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in >> intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs >> are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and >> bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. >> >> These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: >> >> http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 >> Comments are invited. > > Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well. Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. > > * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring > - We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or eight years old. I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to showing it to my mother when I got home. But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform. I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny.
DJ
Daniel J. Matyola
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 12:01 PM

Eastern European also use onions, beets and similar natural dyes to make
Easter eggs of solid colors, which are boiled  and then eaten after being
taken to church on Easter morning to be blessed by the priest.  Pysanki are
dyed raw, with strong non-edible dyes, and are not eaten, but saved for
future display.  Decades ago, one of our Malamutes age a bowl of
pysanki that had to be at least 5 years old, and we had to give him
something to make him regurgitate the mess, lest he be poisoned by the dyes
or sickened by the contents of the eggs.

Dan Matyola
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 12:17 AM mike wilson m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com wrote:

On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com

wrote:

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe

(and

among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the
north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and adults would
be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

Eastern European also use onions, beets and similar natural dyes to make Easter eggs of solid colors, which are boiled and then eaten after being taken to church on Easter morning to be blessed by the priest. Pysanki are dyed raw, with strong non-edible dyes, and are not eaten, but saved for future display. Decades ago, one of our Malamutes age a bowl of pysanki that had to be at least 5 years old, and we had to give him something to make him regurgitate the mess, lest he be poisoned by the dyes or sickened by the contents of the eggs. Dan Matyola *https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery <https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery>* On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 12:17 AM mike wilson <m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com> wrote: > > > On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> > wrote: > > > > > > There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe > (and > > among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in > > intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs > > are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and > > bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. > > > > These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: > > > > http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 > > Comments are invited. > > Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the > north of England as well. Competitions for both children and adults would > be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. > > * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring > -- > %(real_name)s Pentax-Discuss Mail List > To unsubscribe send an email to pdml-leave@pdml.net > to UNSUBSCRIBE from the PDML, please visit the link directly above and > follow the directions. >
J
John
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 1:05 PM

The first one looks almost like one of those Fabergé Eggs. Did you do them
yourself? How long will they last after being decorated that way?

On 4/4/2021 23:50:30, Daniel J. Matyola wrote:

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe (and
among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Dan Matyola
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery

--
Science - Questions we may never find answers for.
Religion - Answers we must never question.

The first one looks almost like one of those Fabergé Eggs. Did you do them yourself? How long will they last after being decorated that way? On 4/4/2021 23:50:30, Daniel J. Matyola wrote: > There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe (and > among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in > intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs > are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and > bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. > > These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: > > http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 > Comments are invited. > > Dan Matyola > *https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery > <https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery>* > -- -- Science - Questions we may never find answers for. Religion - Answers we must never question.
J
John
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 1:08 PM

On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote:

On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com wrote:



On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com wrote:

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe (and
among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or eight years old.

I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to showing it to my mother when I got home.

But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform.

I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny.

--

When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so they
wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken.

--
Science - Questions we may never find answers for.
Religion - Answers we must never question.

On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote: > On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson <m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com> wrote: >> >>  >>> On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> wrote: >>> >>> >>> There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe (and >>> among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in >>> intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs >>> are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and >>> bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. >>> >>> These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: >>> >>> http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 >>> Comments are invited. >> >> Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well. Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. >> >> * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring >> - > > We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or eight years old. > > I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to showing it to my mother when I got home. > > But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform. > > I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny. > > -- When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so they wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken. -- Science - Questions we may never find answers for. Religion - Answers we must never question.
AS
ann sanfedele
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 1:22 PM

my mother gave me and my friends an Easter party.. more than once.   We
always decorated hard boiled eggs with vegetable coloring and an easter
egg hunt around our small apartment was part of the party.  But she did
more.  She made little favors at table of eggs sitting on "collars" with
faces painted on them and a bit of crepe paper for hair.  a boy and girl
at each plate. she made tea sandwiches for us, mostly ham . almost
everyone at table was Jewish..
but not, thank goodness, from Orthodox families.  This was when I was um
9 or 10 I would say.
ann

On 4/5/2021 9:08 AM, John wrote:

On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote:

On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com wrote:

On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com
wrote:

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1

Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in
the north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and
adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or
eight years old.

I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to
showing it to my mother when I got home.

But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a
howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing
typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and
no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the
egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my
uniform.

I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny.

--

When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so
they wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken.

my mother gave me and my friends an Easter party.. more than once.   We always decorated hard boiled eggs with vegetable coloring and an easter egg hunt around our small apartment was part of the party.  But she did more.  She made little favors at table of eggs sitting on "collars" with faces painted on them and a bit of crepe paper for hair.  a boy and girl at each plate. she made tea sandwiches for us, mostly ham . almost everyone at table was Jewish.. but not, thank goodness, from Orthodox families.  This was when I was um 9 or 10 I would say. ann On 4/5/2021 9:08 AM, John wrote: > On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote: >> On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson <m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>> On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> >>> wrote: >>>> >>>> These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: >>>> >>>> http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 >>>> >>>> Comments are invited. >>> >>> Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in >>> the north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and >>> adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. >>> >>> * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring >>> - >> We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or >> eight years old. >> >> I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to >> showing it to my mother when I got home. >> >> But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a >> howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing >> typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and >> no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the >> egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my >> uniform. >> >> I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny. >> >> -- > > When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so > they wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken. > > -- ann sanfedele photography https://annsan.smugmug.com https://www.cafepress.com/+ann-sanfedele+gifts https://www.lulu.com/spotlight/annsan https://www.createphotocalendars.com/Shop/annsanfedelecalendarsandbooks
PS
Paul Stenquist
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 1:57 PM

Great story. As young children my siblings and Ialways colored eggs. Food coloring dye, hot water and vinegar produced vibrant color. My kids and my granddaughter did the same. A nice tradition.

Paul

On Apr 5, 2021, at 9:22 AM, ann sanfedele annsan@nyc.rr.com wrote:

my mother gave me and my friends an Easter party.. more than once.  We always decorated hard boiled eggs with vegetable coloring and an easter egg hunt around our small apartment was part of the party.  But she did more.  She made little favors at table of eggs sitting on "collars" with faces painted on them and a bit of crepe paper for hair.  a boy and girl at each plate. she made tea sandwiches for us, mostly ham . almost everyone at table was Jewish..
but not, thank goodness, from Orthodox families.  This was when I was um 9 or 10 I would say.
ann

On 4/5/2021 9:08 AM, John wrote:

On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote:
On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com wrote:

On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com wrote:

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1
Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or eight years old.

I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to showing it to my mother when I got home.

But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform.

I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny.

--

When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so they wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken.

--
ann sanfedele photography
https://annsan.smugmug.com
https://www.cafepress.com/+ann-sanfedele+gifts
https://www.lulu.com/spotlight/annsan
https://www.createphotocalendars.com/Shop/annsanfedelecalendarsandbooks

%(real_name)s Pentax-Discuss Mail List
To unsubscribe send an email to pdml-leave@pdml.net
to UNSUBSCRIBE from the PDML, please visit the link directly above and follow the directions.

Great story. As young children my siblings and Ialways colored eggs. Food coloring dye, hot water and vinegar produced vibrant color. My kids and my granddaughter did the same. A nice tradition. Paul > On Apr 5, 2021, at 9:22 AM, ann sanfedele <annsan@nyc.rr.com> wrote: > > my mother gave me and my friends an Easter party.. more than once. We always decorated hard boiled eggs with vegetable coloring and an easter egg hunt around our small apartment was part of the party. But she did more. She made little favors at table of eggs sitting on "collars" with faces painted on them and a bit of crepe paper for hair. a boy and girl at each plate. she made tea sandwiches for us, mostly ham . almost everyone at table was Jewish.. > but not, thank goodness, from Orthodox families. This was when I was um 9 or 10 I would say. > ann > >> On 4/5/2021 9:08 AM, John wrote: >>> On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote: >>> On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson <m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com> wrote: >>>> On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>> >>>>> These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: >>>>> >>>>> http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 >>>>> Comments are invited. >>>> >>>> Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the north of England as well. Competitions for both children and adults would be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. >>>> >>>> * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring >>>> - >>> We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or eight years old. >>> >>> I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to showing it to my mother when I got home. >>> >>> But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform. >>> >>> I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny. >>> >>> -- >> >> When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so they wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken. >> >> > > -- > ann sanfedele photography > https://annsan.smugmug.com > https://www.cafepress.com/+ann-sanfedele+gifts > https://www.lulu.com/spotlight/annsan > https://www.createphotocalendars.com/Shop/annsanfedelecalendarsandbooks > -- > %(real_name)s Pentax-Discuss Mail List > To unsubscribe send an email to pdml-leave@pdml.net > to UNSUBSCRIBE from the PDML, please visit the link directly above and follow the directions.
RR
Ralf R Radermacher
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 2:03 PM

Am 05.04.21 um 15:57 schrieb Paul Stenquist:

Great story. As young children my siblings and Ialways colored eggs. Food coloring dye, hot water and vinegar produced vibrant color. My kids and my granddaughter did the same. A nice tradition.

We did as well. Afterwards we were at least as colourful as the eggs... :-)

Ralf

--
Ralf R. Radermacher  -  Köln/Cologne, Germany
Blog  : http://the-real-fotoralf.blogspot.com
Audio : http://aporee.org/maps/projects/fotoralf
Web  : http://www.fotoralf.de

Am 05.04.21 um 15:57 schrieb Paul Stenquist: > Great story. As young children my siblings and Ialways colored eggs. Food coloring dye, hot water and vinegar produced vibrant color. My kids and my granddaughter did the same. A nice tradition. We did as well. Afterwards we were at least as colourful as the eggs... :-) Ralf -- Ralf R. Radermacher - Köln/Cologne, Germany Blog : http://the-real-fotoralf.blogspot.com Audio : http://aporee.org/maps/projects/fotoralf Web : http://www.fotoralf.de
DJ
Daniel J. Matyola
Mon, Apr 5, 2021 7:36 PM

Fabergé Eggs
Dan Matyola
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery
https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 9:09 AM John jsessoms002@nc.rr.com wrote:

On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote:

On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com wrote:



On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" danmatyola@gmail.com

wrote:

There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season.  In Eastern Europe

(and

among  Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in
intricate patterns is a traditional family activity.  Raw eggs
are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and
bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns.

These are some we use to decorate our Easter table:

Comments are invited.

Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the

north of England as well.  Competitions for both children and adults would
be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes.

We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or

eight years old.

I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to

showing it to my mother when I got home.

But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a

howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing
typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no
rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a
broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform.

I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny.

--

When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so they
wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken.

--
Science - Questions we may never find answers for.
Religion - Answers we must never question.

%(real_name)s Pentax-Discuss Mail List
To unsubscribe send an email to pdml-leave@pdml.net
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Fabergé Eggs Dan Matyola *https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery <https://tinyurl.com/DJM-Pentax-Gallery>* On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 9:09 AM John <jsessoms002@nc.rr.com> wrote: > On 4/5/2021 03:28:54, Bob Pdml wrote: > > On 5 Apr 2021, at 05:17, mike wilson <m.9.wilson@ntlworld.com> wrote: > >> > >>  > >>> On 05 April 2021 at 04:50 "Daniel J. Matyola" <danmatyola@gmail.com> > wrote: > >>> > >>> > >>> There are many ways to celebrate the Easter season. In Eastern Europe > (and > >>> among Amerians of Eastern European heritage), coloring Easter eggs in > >>> intricate patterns is a traditional family activity. Raw eggs > >>> are decorated using a wax-resist method employing special styluses and > >>> bright dyes, especially among Ukrainians and Rusyns. > >>> > >>> These are some we use to decorate our Easter table: > >>> > >>> > http://dan-matyola.squarespace.com/danmatyolas-pesos/2021/4/4/pysanki-1 > >>> Comments are invited. > >> > >> Colouring eggs, using a different technique*, used to be common in the > north of England as well. Competitions for both children and adults would > be held in working mens' clubs, with quite serious prizes. > >> > >> * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg#Colouring > >> - > > > > We used to do that at school in Anglesey, when I was about seven or > eight years old. > > > > I remember being very proud of one I’d done and looking forward to > showing it to my mother when I got home. > > > > But at home time it was pouring with rain, bitterly cold, dark, and a > howling gale was blowing in. I had to cycle home through it, wearing > typical school uniform of the time - flannel shorts, blazer etc and no > rainwear. It was bloody miserable and by the time I got home the egg was a > broken mess of paint, shell, cardboard and yolk all over my uniform. > > > > I wasn’t a happy Easter bunny. > > > > -- > > When I was a child we did that too, but we used hard-boiled eggs so they > wouldn't mess anything up (other than the egg) if it got broken. > > > -- > Science - Questions we may never find answers for. > Religion - Answers we must never question. > -- > %(real_name)s Pentax-Discuss Mail List > To unsubscribe send an email to pdml-leave@pdml.net > to UNSUBSCRIBE from the PDML, please visit the link directly above and > follow the directions.