photographing textile arts

Christine Aguila christine at caguila.com
Tue Jun 23 11:31:06 EDT 2020



Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 22, 2020, at 7:23 PM, Bruce Walker <bruce.walker at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Christine, I have photographed painted art, but small enough works
> that I could lay them on the floor and light and shoot down on them.
> 
> I do something like what you propose for portraits when I suspend
> custom painted canvas fabric backdrops from a cross-bar. Usually I
> hang the canvas by securing the short edge with many 4" plastic clamps
> to the cross-arm (an IKEA curtain rod) which is then hoisted up into
> the air with a C-stand boom arm. I use a Superclamp on the end of the
> boom arm to hold the curtain rod.

Yes, thanks!  Curtain rod et al!  This is excellent!

> 
> This means I need to crop out the highest portion of the canvas though
> to avoid seeing the clamps. That may not suit your purpose, of course.
> But you could clone them out in Photoshop.

Yes, cropping and cloning!  Good suggestions!

> By the way, when you light your fabric I suggest that you use two
> sources: one large soft light from behind the camera position for an
> even overall fill; and the second source being a hard light raking
> across the surface at a shallow angle in order to pick up the texture
> in the fabric. Also to make the beads and metal bits shinier and
> visible. You would need to play with the ratio of brightness of the
> two sources to control how much texture and contrast you capture.

Bruce, with the suggestions you make, what lens and what distance would you be shooting at—camera to art work distance?  What would you start with?

Cheers, Christine 






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