photographing textile arts

Christine Aguila christine at caguila.com
Tue Jun 23 11:20:09 EDT 2020



Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 22, 2020, at 6:37 PM, Stan Halpin <stan at stans-photography.info> wrote:
> 
> Hanging fabric may droop of its own weight. I would probable start with a setup allowing you to put the material on a flat surface: the floor, a table, etc, then shoot down from above. I’ve done a bit of this for for-the-record shots of Meg’s, my sister in law’s, and my own (very limited) works. It takes a special talent to properly mount/frame fabric and needlework and it would be hard to replicate with a temporary setup with the object hung vertically.

Some of the artwork would probably already have laced mounting, so drooping wouldn’t be the problem, but you’re right, hanging fabric does have variables like drooping that would have to be dealt with, and if I ended up doing a lot of this, I would have to have multiple set-ups, shoot flat, shoot hanging etc.  I probably would never be able to do large pieces since I don’t have the studio space for it.

Depending on the piece, shooting it still in the embroidery hoop or slate frame might work—though it depends on the piece, “white” space around the design perimeter etc, but with proper support, that might work too, like everything else, experimentation is necessary here.

Thanks, Stan!  Very helpful!  Cheers, Christine 



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