Russian cathedral

Igor PDML-StR pdmlstr at komkon.org
Tue Jan 8 22:48:32 EST 2019


Bob,
It is a nice and intriguing image, but it appears a bit too dark on my 
monitor. I suspect it would look better with white matting.

Interspersed below are my comments to Dan.

Igor


  Bob W-PDML Mon, 07 Jan 2019 15:07:46 -0800

> This is the Russian Orthodox cathedral in London, photographed with my 
> phone on Christmas Eve (not Orthodox Xmas!) after dinner with some 
> friends who live nearby.
>
> 
> https://preview.tinyurl.com/yd27mncz
> 
> https://lightroom.adobe.com/shares/00f4c7321374431ea848517ce1613814/albums/775e41e7fe91462d820fd3ba97d4cc07/assets/d9dff94892dc435d9a93ee80a347da4a






  Daniel J. Matyola Mon, 07 Jan 2019 16:52:49 -0800 wrote:

> It works for me in Chrome.
> 
> I like the lighting and the patterns of light and dark.  To my eye,
> however, it looks nothing like a Russian cathedral.

Dan,

"All cats are grey in the dark".
(I thought it was a Russian proverb, but I've learned it is attributed to 
Benjamin Franklin, but in fact appeared earlier in John Heywood's book 
of proverbs (1546).)


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 8:55 PM Daniel J. Matyola wrote:

> Russian churches tend to be gaudy, like St Basils and the Church on the
> Spilled Blood

I wonder which meaning of the word "gaudy" you assumed here.
I would say that they look very elaborate and rich/expensive, but
it is far from being tasteless (as often implied by the word "gaudy".) 
Besides, those two churches stand apart from most others. Just google
"Russian church" and the see the variety of designs, most of which are 
very different from these two.
BTW, while I am not an expert in architectural styles, from what I 
know, this style is called "pseudo-Russian" (or Russian Byzantine style).

Cheers,

Igor


On 8 Jan 2019, at 02:25, Daniel J. Matyola wrote:

> BTW, today is Russian Chrisrmas.
> 
> С РОЖДЕСТВОМ

Actually, it was yesterday, January 7, but you might have been in 
a different time zone. And to be more exact, - it is not just Russian, but
apparently it is celebrated by the majority of the members of the Eastern 
Orthodox Church (albeit it is the minority of the autocephalous 
Orthodox Churches)
That's confusing, isn't it? In simple words, - the Orthodox Churches in 
several other countries in Eastern Europe/Asia celebrate Christmas 
according to the Julian calendar. Georgia, Armenia, Ukraine, Serbia, 
come to mind. And I just looked it up: The Orthodox Churches of Macedonia, 
Montenegro, Jerusalem, Poland are on that list.

Anyway, C Рождеством! :)

Igor






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