Off Topic: emoticons, smileys, etc

Bob W pdml at web-options.com
Wed Feb 23 15:47:14 EST 2011


> > Writing was invented in approximately 4000 BC. Since then people have
> been
> > able to write to each other quite successfully without needing
> emoticons,
> > smilies, 'mark-up' and other non-standard orthography.
> 
> i say capital letters are markup, along with all punctuation, spacing,
> and any use of puns or rhyme ;?>
> 

indeed. The Romans did well enough with none of those. Perhaps with the
exception of puns.

> 
> > I really don't know
> > why people have suddenly decided to resort to privately-defined
> systems of
> > non-communication.
> 
> as opposed to publicly-defined systems of non-communication? (which is
> what a lot of business language seems to be)
> 

I worked from home yesterday, reading a book about that well-known oxymoron
'business intelligence'. Everything in it was useful and quite interesting
(given the context), but they didn't need 120 pages to say it - they could
have said it in no more than 30. They should have leveraged their
dictionaries a bit more, and leveraged the word 'use' instead of 'leverage'.

> 
> > If you're not writing in your first language then you have to take a
> bit of
> > extra care and stick to the standard variety&  register of the
> language,
> > avoiding archaic, precious or excessively formal or informal
> language.
> 
> i understand this sentiment, and i agree it's good to take such care
> in,
> say, business, but in the broader sphere i don't agree with "have to
> ...
> stick to" -- i like the interesting constructions that come from
> non-native speakers -- they refresh me and give me pause to reflect on
> my language; for example i listen to/watch Democracy Now! and i admire
> the fact that they let people say complicated things in heavily
> accented
> English without providing any "help"
> 

Yes. I didn't really mean "have to". Everyone can do whateverage they want
and leverage in any damned language they want. It all depends on how
successfully they want to communicate.
 
> 
> > If you are using your first language then you have to remember that
> many of
> > your readers are not, so take a bit of extra care and stick to the
> standard
> > variety&  register of the language, avoiding archaic, precious or
> > excessively formal or informal language.
> 
> now that's markup!







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